25 Best Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs

best places to find freelance writing jobsIf you are a freelance writer, then that means you’re not on the clock. You’re not getting paid to sit there. You only make money when you work. That’s why you can’t waste your precious minutes looking through sites that promise leads on legitimate freelance writing jobs, but fail to deliver. Instead, they just copy and paste posts off Craigslist and regurgitate them into an unorganized newsletter.

At The Writer’s Job Board, our goal is to help you go from a part-time freelancer to full-time writer. In pursuit of that goal, we’ve decided to spend a few hours compiling all of our favorite freelance writing job websites into one useful post. Hopefully this will help you get those dollars rolling in.

We’ve based our criteria for the top writing job websites on a few cornerstones:

  1. How well they organize the job information
  2. Ease of searching the site for a particular kind of writing job
  3. The quality of writing jobs they post
  4. How often they update their job listings
  5. How long it takes to find good writing jobs on their site
  6. Miscellaneous factors such as whether or not they publish blogs with writing tips or resources, if they have an involved community of writers on a forum, etc.

Without further ado, here are the 25 best places to find freelance writing jobs, and sometimes a little something extra.

 

1. The Writer’s Job Board

We may be biased, but it would be hard to start our list without mentioning our freelance writing job board. We try and update our job listings at least three to four times a week with writing jobs that include the name of the hiring company, links to their website, and any other applicable information. In addition to our job board, we also publish helpful articles in our Freelance Writing Tips section. There can find tips on how to handle your accounting, how to create a website to market your skills, tax write-offs for a writing business and even a listing of Paying Markets for writing submissions.

On our job board, you can filter your search results by part-time, full-time, internship, freelance, contract or temporary, and you’ll find ads for positions in the full spectrum of writing work, from copywriting content for a law firm and niche blogging to mentoring at a writing center or grant writing jobs.

 

2. The Freelance Writer’s Den

The Freelance Writer’s Den is owned and operated by six-figure making published author Carol Tice. What makes it unique is that either Tice or one of her staff members is almost always manning “The Den.” They are at their computers, ready to answer any questions you have related to freelance writing, from how to negotiate salaries to how to up your productivity. The Den also hosts three live trainings monthly and a handful of boot camps each year. To have access to these tools as well as notice of job opportunities, you do need to be a member of the den. The good news is that it’s so successful at helping its members that it’s currently closed and has a waiting list. That’s also the bad news, but it is worth it to sign up on the waiting list because this is a real live community of writing professionals who will help you get a lucrative job. It’s the next best thing to in-person networking.

 

3. WriteJobs

Writer Jobs is part of the larger community Resources for Writers and provides tools that writers need for every part of their work, from graphic design for your website to invoice templates and business card creators. It also stays up to date on upcoming writers’ contests, writers’ events, and deadlines for submissions to poetry and short story journals, and other niche publications. Finally, it lists quality-paying jobs and breaks them into editorial or writing, with the writing section broken up into the subcategories of ads listing specific per-piece-pay and ads listing more variable pay rates like “Depending on Experience” or “Up to $30 an hour.” You can also purchase their e-book, which lists the top 500 best-paying publications.

 

4. FlexJobs

Flex Jobs is the online headhunter of writing jobs, and writers, screening every company offering jobs and every writer providing services thoroughly. As a writer, you can create a profile through which you upload samples of your previous work as well as a resume so employers with a job that matches your skill set can easily find you. They search the hundreds of sources of freelance jobs, so you don’t have to, and then provide you with the most direct way to apply for that job. It is a paid site, but it provides an incredible value because no job listed on there will be a waste of your time. You can choose monthly, quarterly or yearly plans that are all reasonably priced and will pay for themselves once you’ve written just one article for a job listed here. The jobs are broken up into intuitive search categories like location and most flexible. You can also search jobs by the company if you have a specific one for which you’d like to work.

 

5. Freelance Writing Gigs

Freelance Writing Gigs scours several of the other major sites listing writing jobs, and collects them into nice, straight-forward categories like online content jobs, editing jobs, blogger jobs, publishing jobs, telecommuting jobs and flexible jobs. The way to make the most of the site is to sign up for its newsletter because it will send you that list of jobs every evening, along with either a helpful, informative or inspirational blog post at the top on tackling the world of freelance writing. Their blog posts delve into experiences every freelance writer has, from writer’s block to dealing with friends and family who don’t respect your privacy when you work from home.

 

6. Be a Freelance Blogger

Be a Freelance Blogger is a great site with lots of useful information and tools to help you boost your writing career. You can check their job forum, sign up for an online class that will help you find higher paying clients, or just browse their blog. They also have a free eBook called The Ultimate List of Better-Paid Blogging Gigs. The book lists 75 blogs that pay $50 or more per post. When you order it, you also get the Money-Making Toolkit, which has several useful tools including an online training session on how to get clients, and a guide on how much you should get paid as a writer for different types of jobs.

 

7. Problogger

Problogger caters to the writer hoping to make an income off of his own website, as opposed to writing for somebody else’s. It has tips on how to drive traffic to your blog, what sort of schedule your posts should be on, and even how to optimize your content for mobile users. It also has a twice-weekly podcast with blogging tips, as well as hosts training events where successful bloggers share their advice on how to make a sustainable and gainful living off of the craft. On its job board, you’ll find a lot of positions creating content for corporations or businesses, and the occasional blogger job. Their jobs board lets you filter work by full and part-time, internship, contract, temporary and freelance, but it also gives you the option to search keywords and location. So if you want a to write about veganism in Tempe, Arizona, you can probably find a related job on this site.

 

8. Blogging Pro

Blogging Pro has an easy-to-use interface that reads like an online magazine, with featured stories running along the top, and the option to scroll down and see the full archive of tips and news in the blogging world. They regularly highlight new tools that can help you gain more followers to your blog, like affordable stock image platforms and programs that help you track and analyze your viewership. They also list their favorite books and e-books for bloggers.

 

9. Freelance Writing

Freelance Writing is a comprehensive site—almost a lifestyle site for writers. It suggests insightful media for writers to watch and read, like talk shows and audio articles. It also has discussion forums and an “Ask the Experts” page where published authors and successful writers answer creative and logistical questions. The site has tutorials like “How to Write a Query Letter” and it has articles on very specific needs of freelance writers, like how to plan for retirement and how to work with an editor. As for its job page, it sources leads from other sites on our list, like LinkedIn, ProBlogger, and MediaBistro. You can choose to see results from as many or as little of these sites as you’d like, and filter work by writing, copywriting, blogging, social media, editing/proofreading, and technical writing jobs.

 

10. Indeed

Indeed is a simple platform and it makes submitting to jobs easy; you upload your resume, set preferences for what type of jobs you are looking for, and the site will email you notifications when positions matching your skills and specifications come up. In most cases, you can apply through Indeed by hitting the “Apply Now” button. The site sends along your resume, and you just wait for the company to contact you if they’re interested. When you go to Indeed.com, you’ll be met with a clean page that just has two bars in which you type in keywords for the type of work you want and the city or zip code you want to work in. You’ll be guided through the process of setting up your resume and preferences from there.

 

11. Freelance Job Openings

Freelance Job Openings is a straightforward job board. Each posting lists the name of the position, the name of the company (sometimes it will be confidential), the city it is based out of, whether or not it can be worked remotely, and the date the job was posted. Clicking on the position will give you more information about the position, like what your tasks and workload will be, as well as pay and background on the company. On the top you can filter by experience level, location, and type of writing.

 

12. ED2010

ED2010 is a networking and mentorship program for aspiring magazine writers and editors and as such, it has chapters on over twenty college campuses across America that host events and lectures. It posts some insider information from the magazine world, too. For example, on the Real Salaries page, you can select publications and see what active writers get paid there. On their jobs page, you’ll find location-based and telecommuting jobs, many of which are in the areas of lifestyle. A peek at the list today would show you editorial, intern and writing positions at fashion and healthy living publications. They do a good job of staying in the loop on highly coveted positions, too, like internships at Cosmopolitan magazine.

 

13. All Indie Writers

All Indie Writers answers real questions that writers deal with daily, like whether or not to work at content mills, how to facilitate good relationships with your editors and even how to navigate WordPress and popular blogging platforms. It breaks its advice posts up into categories for bloggers, indie publishers, and freelance writers, but then it has categories that apply to everyone like finances of writing, organization and productivity tips, and social media guidelines. There are also several active forums on the site where writers exchange words of wisdom, best practices and tools they’ve discovered for writers. The jobs page lists positions that have been posted in the last thirty days. Aside from stating the position, type of work and pay range, the site also states next to each pay range whether it is very low pay, semi-pro or pro rate, so you know what sort of experience you’ll need to compete for that job.

 

14. Idealist

Idealist is a resource for activists fighting for social change of every kind. Here they can find notices about events in their area relating to their particular form of activism, upcoming workshops, lectures and more. But as a freelance writer, what matters to you is how Idealist funds all of these activities, and it’s through their job postings. Companies throughout the US pay a small fee to post their job listings on the site. Since it is an activist-centric site, the jobs tend to be as well. You’ll find grant writing jobs, creative writing workshop teaching jobs, managing editor positions at socially-conscious websites and the like.

 

15. Edu Jobs

Edu Jobs is just a job board, plain and simple. But it has a cool layout where you can choose how you view jobs. There is a flip card screen that just has squares listing the job name, and if you click on one, it flips over to give you more information. There is a sidebar option where the job titles appear in an ongoing—you called it—side bar and clicking on them gives you full descriptions of jobs including skill requirements, hours, exact qualifications and history on the company. There is also a classic Magazine style layout. The jobs lean more towards educational and technical writing and less towards lifestyle and entertainment. There are even SAT essay reading and elementary curriculum writing jobs.

 

16. Craigslist

Don’t be quick to write off Craigslist just because of its colorful “Missed Connections” section. Some legitimate writing jobs find their way onto Craigslist. In fact, some of the better-paying ones are on here because (and don’t ever tell them I said this) if they are on Craigslist it’s usually because they don’t know about the content mills available where they can pay $8 an article. In other words, they’re naïve to how cheap they can be. Good. With that in mind, there are some odd jobs on there, too.

As a general rule, don’t reply to job posting that have any of these: 1) Typos. Any legitimate writing employer would have checked that. 2) Say payment is “Profit sharing.” That usually means the company has no money yet, so it will take a long time for them to build enough revenue for “Profit sharing” to be worth it to you. 3) Ask you to do tons of spec work. If they want a sample, they can pay you for that. Otherwise, they may be looking for the same article “On spec” from five writers, with the intention of telling everyone their piece weren’t good enough, not paying them, and publishing the pieces anyways. You can find a lot more information on how to filter and search all Craigslist writing jobs at once here.

 

17. Journalism Jobs

Journalismjobs.com does have predominantly journalism work, but the journalism world today isn’t what it used to be. You don’t need to have teleprompter experience, or know how to take shorthand. There are several freelance, part-time positions on here for managing editors, copywriters and specialty writers (like a non-specific location finance writer for an otherwise local online magazine). If, however, you are serious about strict journalism, the site lists hundreds of journalism fellowships available and posts articles on up-to-date media ethics and best practices. So it can be a learning resource for aspiring news writers as well.

 

18. Media Bistro

Media Bistro receives some heavy-hitters on the client end. As I write this, HBO has a job opening listed on the site. It has plenty of non-writing jobs, too, but its wheelhouse is content creation (hence the word “Media” in the name). And as such, it has some highly cherished articles on career advancement for writers. The articles are usually way ahead of the game, and can give some great insights on how to find and land writing jobs. For example, one of their posts is called “Here’s How To Find A Job Before It’s Posted.” They also host well-attended conferences and lectures for and by established writers, so signing up for their newsletter is worth it.

 

19. 155 Markets That Pay Freelance Writers 10 to 15 Cents Per Word

This little eBook is only $5, or free to Kindle subscribers on Amazon. It delivers exactly what the title says, with names of publications that pay 10 to 15 cents per word, who to contact there, and how to promote yourself to each one. The book may not be free, but if you get just one 500 word job off of it, you’ll make $50 ($45 in profit after purchasing the book).

 

20. We Work Remotely

We Work Remotely posts freelance work of every nature, and while the writing jobs don’t show up in hoards, the ones that do are high quality and usually full-time positions. The site posts a lot of work from corporations looking for copywriters, content managers and content creators, and publishes the direct email address of the hiring contact at the company.

21. Genuine Jobs

Genuinejobs is a free site updated daily with job listings from every industry, including hundreds in writing. The site posts listings for one-time feature writers, full-time copy editors, transcribers, content managers and nearly any type of writing work imaginable. You can also sign up for their newsletter to get notifications of new jobs, and you can read their blog on telecommuting work for tips on how to succeed as a freelancer.

22. Simply Hired

Simply Hired is an easy-to-navigate job board that is updated almost daily. It has most of the usual filters found on other sites like the name of the job position, the date the job was added and the company offering the job. The site also has a few special advanced filters, such as Fortune 500 companies, LGBT friendly, socially responsible, mom-friendly jobs, and jobs for recent graduates so you can find work that fits your lifestyle and passions. If you like a particular listing, you can sign up for the site’s newsletter and it will send you similar jobs.

 

23. The Write Life

The Write Life has a very full job board with filters designed to help you find jobs that are just within your niche; you can filter by years of experience required, education level, company and more. But it’s also a useful site for writers with larger, long-term aspirations. The site offers articles and webinars on self-publishing, as well as tips on marketing your work. It also has a section dedicated to advice on the craft of writing, like how to find new ideas and how to make more time for writing. It also has the most up-to-date information on what publishers and agents are looking for today.

 

24. Creative Circle

Creative Circle is an online recruitment firm that connects talent with hiring companies in almost every industry, many of which are searching for writers to upkeep their company blog, create copy for their site, or edit work from other writers. You do need to select a region or city to find jobs, but many of the listings are remote, so it pays off to peruse all of the cities listed. If you’re interested in a job, click it and you’ll find the description the company wrote, including job description, hours and pay. If you want to apply, you fill out a form on CreativeCircle.com that tells the employer about you, but often the employer lists their direct email in the ad.

 

25. Glass Door

Glass Door is unique in that it lets you read reviews from other writers on what it’s like to work for the companies who post jobs there. Most people tend to think that is the extent of the website’s use, but they actually have a pretty good job board too. You can search their writing jobs using very handy filters, like salary, company, location, etc. To increase your chances of landing a job, you can also look at common interview questions real writers have recently been asked in job interviews.

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